Sintonia Distorta ‎– A Piedi Nudi Sull'Arcobaleno

The Italian formation Sintonia Distorta was founded in 1995 by Simone Pesatori (vocals) and Favio Tavazzi (bass), they started playing covers of hard rock - and metal bands. In 2007 keyboardist Giampiero Manenti joined the band, adding a more progressive element to the music.  Then it took 8 years before the band released its debut album entitled Fragments D'incanto, it contains also all tracks from a demo tape that Sintonia Distorta released earlier. The sound on the first album is a blend of hardrock, prog metal and heavy prog, with hints from Iron Maiden, Metallica, Deep Purple, Rush, Journey, Uriah Heep and Europe. It’s pretty simply structured with lots of up tempo songs, and  some ballads. I am pleased with the guitar and organ work, and the strong Italian vocals. But the songs tend to sound a bit similar, at some moments my attention slips away. Nonetheless, the band shows potential, and the album was received well by the press. In 2016 Cladio Marchiori became the new guitarist, and in 2020 Sintonia Distorta released its second album entitled A Piedi Nudi Sull'Arcobaleno, produced by the known and prolific Fabio Zuffanti. On this new album the band is expanded to a six piece formation with flute – and saxophone player Marco Miceli.

Listening to A Piedi Nudi Sull'Arcobaleno I am blown away by the huge ‘progressive progress’ of the band, from simply structured heavy prog to elaborate prog rock, incredible! The six compositions (between 3 and 10 minutes) deliver lots of shifting moods, instrumental interludes and surprising breaks. This is embellished with tasteful work on keyboards, guitar and flute, and strong, often emotional Italian vocals. The outstanding interplay strongly evokes influences from classical music, especially in the titletrack (including moving electric guitar and a varied keyboards, from organ and piano to Mellotron) and the dynamic epic La Rivincita Di Orfeo (from a Mellotron choir sound to fiery guitar). The track Sabri showcases the mellow side of the band featuring warm acoustic guitar and emotional vocal outbursts. My highligh is the final song Madre Luna (close to 8 minutes). It starts with tender piano runs, soaring strings, mellow saxophone play and laidback vocals. Halfway a fiery guitar solo with Mellotron violins, then again tender piano and vocals. Finally a compelling part with a children choir, strong vocals, a moving guitar solo, topped with Mellotron choir and Minimoog synthesizer flights. In the end first a heavy guitar solo, and finally the soft voice of a child. Wow, what a dynamic and captivating compostion, the band at its best.

And how promising, I am looking forward to Sintonia Distorta its next release!

© 2020 Erik Neuteboom