Blind Golem - A Dream of Fantasy

Posted 310521

Review: Erik Neuteboom

The five-piece formation Blind Golem is a fusion of two Italian bands named Bullfrog (a harder-edged blues band) and Forever Heep (Uriah Heep tribute band) that had assembled as a  backing band for a tour fronted by the late Ken Hensley. Blind Golem also played thousands of shows through the years backing rock legends like Don Airey, Roger Glover, Ian Paice, John Lawton and Uriah Heep. Such a coupling of talent soon became the inspiration for the band to work on own original material, with the goal to produce a first album. The cover art was designed by Rodney Matthews, responsible for countless ‘classic’ covers of bands like Thin Lizzy, Nazareth, Magnum and the late Uriah Heep singer David Byron his band Diamond Head.

I grew up with Live by Uriah Heep as an adolescent in the early Seventies, I still often play their Seventies albums. And a few years ago I attended a gig during the tour of the 35th anniversay of the legendary Look At Yourself LP. So no surprise that listening to Blind Golem was a very pleasant experience, to me it sounds as a strong and inspired tribute to Seventies Uriah Heep: solid Heavy Prog compositions featuring a swirling Hammond sound, biting wah wah drenched guitar soli, moving work on the slide guitar, the distinctive David Byron ‘timbre’ (high pitched and the use of “ahah”), and a lot of tracks with Minimoog flights (colouring the music in a very tasteful way). By the way, the Moog solo in The Gathering sounds mighty close to Keith Emerson in Lucky Man!

In some songs Blind Golem turns to mellow. Like in Night Of Broken Dreams: warm vocals, sensitive electric guitar runs, halfway gradually more lush with moving guitar solo, and finally again dreamy. Also in Carousel:  acoustic rhythm guitar, pretty emotional vocals, then the Hammond joins, followed by work on the slide guitar solo, and in the end a swinging electric piano solo. And in A Spell And A Charm: dreamy twanging acoustic guitar, blended with tender vocals, and halfway slide guitar joins, simply wonderful.

The composition The Day Is Gone includes a wonderful contribution from guest musician Ken Hensley on slide guitar, in a bluesy atmosphere with melancholical vocals and lush Hammond, at some moments July Morning comes to my mind.

If you like Hammond and heavy guitar drenched rock like Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Atomic Rooster, I highly recommend this album, what a very pleasant musical time machine to the Seventies!