Agusa - En Annan Värld

Posted: 180921

Review Erik Neuteboom

Agusa is a new Swedish four piece formation that started in 2013 with Tobias Pettersson on bass,  Mikael Ödesjö on guitar, Dag Strömkvist on drums and finally Jonas Berge on the organ. The name is derived from the place where the band did jam sessions. Late 2013 Agusa went into the studio to record the debut album entitled Högtid, released in early 2014. During the winter drummer Dag Strömkvist decided to leave and to travel around India for a while. After a number of auditions Tim Wallander joined the band, and in the beginning of 2015 Jenny Puertas on flute became the newest Agusa member. In 2015 Agusa released the second effort entitled Två, followed by Agusa in 2017, and a serie of live albums between 2016 and 2018. And now, anno 2021, Agusa has released a new album named En Annan Värld featuring two epic instrumental compositions.

 

Tracklist:

Sagobrus (25:01) : This longest track is in the 24-carat symphonic rock tradition: dynamic and varied, with lots of changing atmosperes and breaks, and coloured by a wide range of instruments. The one moment dreamy with twanging acoustic guitar and soaring flute (strongly reminding me of fellow Swedish band Anglagard) or a slow rhythm featuring a Hammond organ solo and a fiery, distorted guitar, turning in a sumptuous climate. The other moment an accelaration with Jethro Tull-like flute traverse, and a tight beat. Or from dreamy with churchy Hammond sound and moving guitar solo to atmospheric with organ arpeggios, slowly turning into more dynamic and bombastic, embellished with pleasant flute, organ and guitar work (again reminding me of Anglagard but also Camel). My highlight is halfway: a mid-tempo with a long and swirling solo on Hammond organ (evoking Peter Bardens from Camel), and strong rhythm-section, topped with a wah-wah drenched guitar sound. The shifting moods are very flowing and the band succeeds to keep my attention, bravo!

Uppenbarelser (21:12) : This other epic composition strongly differs from the previous one. First the emphasis  is on ambient and atmospheric music featuring sound collages, soaring flute and organ, gradually a slow rhythm, turning into more dynamic with sensitive electric guitar leads. Then back to mellow with soaring flute, a mellow sounding Hammond joins, followed by fragile howling electric guitar runs, powerful bass work, and a short flute solo. Halfway the mood shifts to psychedelic, like early Pink Floyd, with a fiery and biting electric guitar solo, and dreamy organ play, pretty hypnotizing and compelling. In the final part (more sounding like the first composition) first dreamy with flute, then turning into bombastic with organ, guitar and flute (again Anglagard hints), and finally back to dreamy with flute and tender acoustic guitar. A pleasant variety.