Yesterdays – Saint-Exupéry álma

Posted: 311022

Review Erik Neuteboom

This band is rooted in 2000, in Romania but hosts Hungarian musicians that live as a minority in that country. In 2006 the band released its debut album Holdfenykert, a wonderful blend of folk, jazz, symphonic rock and classical. In 2011 it was followed by Colours Caffe, in that time I witnessed Yesterdays during a Dutch triple concert, they made a lot of friends with their music. After a long silence in 2018 Yesterdays came back with the album Senki Madara, I named it “a pleasant marriage between folk and symphonic rock”. And now, 4 years later the band has released its fourth studio album entitled Saint-Exupery Alma, derived from the author of the know French story Le Petit Prince. The musical brainchild of the current line-up of Yesterdays is still Bogáti-Bokor Ákos (electric - and acoustic guitars, bass, Mellotron, Minimoog, Hammond, Grand piano, additional percussion and drums, and lead & backing vocals).

 

On this new album Yesterdays deliver nine tastefully arranged compositions (between 3 and 12 minutes), very melodic and harmonic, embellished with tons of work on the Mellotron and Minimoog, and topped with strong native female vocals. The music often shifts from mellow with soaring flute to mid-tempo and sumptuous eruptions, especially in the longer tracks. Although the music has obvious hints from Yes and often reminds me of Belgian proggers Machiavel (due to the flashy Minimoog runs and majestic Mellotron choir eruptions) Yesterdays presents a pleasant amount of own musical ideas. Like a jazzy Hammond solo and fine contrast between a fiery wah-wah guitar and soaring flute in Ma Minden Erdekel, distorted vocals and powerful drum beats in the atmospheric and a bit ominous A Mereg, and tender piano and flute in the short and mellow Panoptikum. My highlight is the epic composition Esotanc (close to 21 minutes): first an experimental intro with sounds and Mellotron, then a cheerful climate with flute, rock guitar, Minimoog and Hammond, between mellow and bombastic, topped with strong native female vocals, halfway awesome Mellotron choir eruptions, and in the end soaring flute with Mellotron choirs.